More Spring Flowers

This is a collection of many photos of spring flowers that I’ve taken over the past month.

From May 5th

I have two of these red-flowering azalea bushes.  This one was on the west side of the house, where it wasn’t doing well.  I moved it to a shady spot on the north side of the garage four or five years ago, and it has doubled in size.

red-flowered azalea

red-flowered azalea

This azalea is still on the west side of the house but it grows well there.  The colors appear different because of the lighting, but these seem to be identical bushes.  They were both planted before we bought the house.

red-flowered azalea

red-flowered azalea

closeup

red azalea flowers

red azalea flowers

blueberry, inside a re-purposed tomato cage

blueberry flowers

blueberry flowers

The following three photos are of my dogwood tree, which like the azaleas above was planted before we bought the house, and which we also moved to a location with more shade.  Azaleas and dogwoods are usually found in the understory of the forest, so they do best with some shade.

flowering dogwood

flowering dogwood

flowering dogwood

flowering dogwood

pink dogwood flowers

pink dogwood flowers

This frilly tulip was also planted by the previous owners.

tulip flower

tulip flower

Mazus reptans is fairly good at crowding out weeds and it has pretty flowers.

Mazus reptans flowers

Mazus reptans flowers

Another favorite groundcover is this Whitley’s speedwell, which isn’t quite as good at keeping weeds at bay but does look nice.  It is planted beneath the cherry tree and under some rose bushes.

Whitley's speedwell flowers

Whitley’s speedwell flowers

This flower used to be larger, but the lily-of-the-valley has crowded it out.  It was planted before we bought the house, but I believe it is a primrose.

primrose flowers

primrose flowers

Of course, many weeds also bloom in spring.  In this photo, violet, creeping charlie, and dandelion all are in flower.  The clover will bloom later.  I wouldn’t care about having any of these in my lawn (indeed, I do little to discourage them) if they didn’t spread into the flower and vegetable gardens.  The happy, yellow dandelion flowers are something of a guilty pleasure, violets are pretty, and clover provides a benefit as a nectar source for bees.

violet, creeping charlie, and dandelion flowers

violet, creeping charlie, and dandelion flowers

I’d never noticed bees visiting dandelions until I saw this one.  I’ve also seen goldfinches feasting on dandelion seeds, another reason to let them grow.

dandelion flower with bee

dandelion flower with bee

From May 7th

the red-flowering azalea near the garage, again

red-flowered azalea

red-flowered azalea

These plants, which I believe are coral bells (they came for free with an order) are nestled between the red-flowered azalea seen in the photo above, a purple-flowered azalea, and lily-of-the-valley, which I have to pull out to keep it from overrunning the coral bells.  The coral bells were on the north side of the house but have grown better since I moved them here.  The flowers have a faint but lovely scent.  Of course, coral bells are grown more for their foliage than their flowers.  The green leaves of this variety are so bright they almost seem to glow.

coral bells flowers

coral bells flowers

From May 11th

the red-flowering azalea on the west side of the house, again

red-flowered azalea

red-flowered azalea

This is a deciduous azalea (meaning it loses its leaves in winter) that I planted where the other red-flowering azalea used to be, on the west side of the house.  It also isn’t growing well in that spot.  The flowers you see here are as much as it has produced since it was transplanted, and several branches have died.

yellow deciduous azalea flowers

yellow deciduous azalea flowers

In this photo, the deciduous azalea is in the middle right (note the dead branches), another variety of coral bells (Heuchera x ‘pewter veil’) is on the left, and Lamium maculatum ‘Chequers’ (dead nettle) is in the foreground and behind the azalea.  A spreading Japanese yew is in the back, Japanese hinoki (false cypress) is on the far left, and another dwarf conifer (probably Alberta spruce) is on the right.

Japanese hinoki (false cypress), Heuchera x 'pewter veil', spreading Japanese yew, deciduous azalea,  Lamium maculatum 'Chequers' (dead nettle), and dwarf Alberta spruce

clockwise from bottom left: Japanese hinoki (false cypress), Heuchera x ‘pewter veil’, spreading Japanese yew, deciduous azalea, Lamium maculatum ‘Chequers’ (dead nettle), and dwarf Alberta spruce

another view of the coral bells and lamium

Heuchera x 'pewter veil' and Lamium maculatum 'Chequers' (dead nettle)

Heuchera x ‘pewter veil’ and Lamium maculatum ‘Chequers’ (dead nettle)

lamium flowers and ant

Lamium maculatum 'Chequers' (dead nettle) flowers and ant

Lamium maculatum ‘Chequers’ (dead nettle) flowers and ant

frilly tulip again, with white-flowering azalea in the background

tulip flower and white-flowered azalea

tulip flower and white-flowered azalea

pawpaw (Asimina triloba), a fruit tree native to North America

pawpaw flowers

pawpaw flowers

One of the best things in spring is the scent of lilac blossoms.

flowering lilac

flowering lilac

closeup

lilac flowers

lilac flowers

From May 18th

azalea trio:  pink-, purple-, and red-flowering (still blooming!); lily-of-the-valley on the left and Mazus reptans in front

pink-, purple-, and red-flowered azaleas, lily-of-the-valley, and flowering Mazus reptans

pink-, purple-, and red-flowered azaleas, lily-of-the-valley, and flowering Mazus reptans

azalea trio from the left side

pink-, purple-, and red-flowered azaleas, lily-of-the-valley, and flowering Mazus reptans

pink-, purple-, and red-flowered azaleas, lily-of-the-valley, and flowering Mazus reptans

deciduous peony bud with ants feeding on the nectar

peony flower bud with ants

peony flower bud with ants

From May 26th

pink-flowering azalea, again

pink-flowered azalea

pink-flowered azalea

Tiarella cordifolia (foamflower), used as a groundcover on the north side of the house

Tiarella cordifolia flowers

Tiarella cordifolia flowers

iris

iris flower

iris flower

Black raspberry is probably the easiest to grow of all the types of fruit that I have.

flowers of black raspberry

flowers of black raspberry

very large, purple-flowering rhododendron

purple-flowered rhododendron

purple-flowered rhododendron

‘woolly’ creeping thyme, a groundcover for sunny areas

flowering 'woolly' creeping thyme

flowering ‘woolly’ creeping thyme

From May 29th

The white clover blooms a little later than the other weeds in the photo above.

white clover flower

white clover flower

I planted this red-flowering rhododendron a few years ago.  It will remain much smaller than the purple-flowering rhododendron above.

red-flowered rhododendron

red-flowered rhododendron

Golden star (Chrysogonum virginianum) is a native plant that I use as a ground cover in shady areas.  The groups of bright yellow flowers are visible from across the yard.

Chrysogonum virginianum (Golden star) flowers

Chrysogonum virginianum (Golden star) flowers

Sage is grown so we can use its leaves in cooking, but it also has some attractive flowers.  It was easy to grow this small shrub from seed.  They also will self-seed, which is useful as sage plants don’t live very long.

flowers of culinary sage

flowers of culinary sage

Mock orange is another shrub that, like lilac, is a favorite not only for its appearance but for its fragrance as well.  The flowers have just begun to open.

mock orange flower

mock orange flower

About brianbreczinski

work: chemist, NMR manager; hobbies: gardening, reading, photography, electronics, biking, woodworking
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16 Responses to More Spring Flowers

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