Planting Flowers in Pots

As I’ve mentioned before, I like to plant annual flowers in pots and use them to add color around my yard.  I can move the pots to more visible places when the plants in them are flowering heavily.  When I ordered seeds this year, I chose some that were suitable for growing in pots.

This week, I planted flower seeds in two large pots.  Both had lost soil over the years that I’ve used them, so after I removed the old roots (from the pot that had zinnias) and dug around with a garden trowel to loosen things, I mixed in some peat moss and slow-release fertilizer to enrich the soil.

On Monday, I planted snapdragon ‘rocket red’ seeds in the pot where zinnias grew last year.  These tiny seeds must be planted on top of the soil, so I covered the pot with plastic wrap to keep the seeds moist.  I had to use tape to hold the plastic wrap to the pot, as the wrap seems to stick to itself but nothing else.

Plastic wrap covers this pot that contains surface-planted snapdragon seeds.

Plastic wrap covers this pot that contains surface-planted snapdragon seeds.

Today, I planted sunflower ‘dwarf sunspot’ in the planter at my office that had multiple generations of cosmos growing in it for about two years.  The last plant died recently, as you can see in the photo below.  As I was mixing the peat moss into the pot, I found an old plant label.  I grew sunflower ‘music box’ in this pot several years ago.  After the seeds in those sunflowers’ heads ripened, a flock of goldfinches descended on them and ate them all, an entertaining sight and another great reason to grow these flowers.

This pot containing a dead cosmos flower is about to have peat moss mixed in to prepare it for sunflower seeds.

This pot containing a dead cosmos flower is about to have peat moss mixed in to prepare it for sunflower seeds.

Many annual flowers are easy to grow, and they often have much longer bloom times than perennial flowers.  Using large pots like these allows me to expand my available garden space and can let someone with no access to a garden do at least a little planting.  Some vegetable varieties, and many herbs, can be grown in pots, too.

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About brianbreczinski

work: chemist, NMR manager; hobbies: gardening, reading, photography, electronics, biking, woodworking
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4 Responses to Planting Flowers in Pots

  1. Pingback: Snapdragon Flowers | gardenblog2013

  2. Pingback: Moving Flowers Back to the Office | gardenblog2013

  3. Pingback: Aphids | gardenblog2013

  4. Pingback: Planting Basil | gardenblog2013

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