Re-potting the Dwarf Pomegranates

My three dwarf pomegranate trees have been growing in some small pots for a couple of years, and I felt they needed larger pots to flourish.  Pomegranates do well in dry conditions, so I chose terra-cotta pots that should help prevent waterlogged soil.

To fill in the extra space in the larger pots, I used potting soil that I purchased at a home center.  It contains fertilizer that is supposed to feed the plants for a few months.  I added some sand to the soil, again to help prevent it from becoming waterlogged.  I used pool filter sand because it is clean and contains uniform, small grains.

I also used a terra-cotta pot and added sand to the soil when I re-potted the jade plant last year, and I think it’s growing better now.

potting soil and pool filter sand

potting soil and pool filter sand

I put landscape fabric at the bottom of the pots to keep the soil from running out the drainage hole.

terra-cotta pot with landscape fabric in the bottom

terra-cotta pot with landscape fabric in the bottom

Next, I added enough soil/sand mix to the new pot to make up the difference in height between it and the old pot.  I poked a soil knife around the inside edge of the old pots to loosen the root balls so I could remove the trees more easily.

Use a soil knife to loosen the soil around the edge of the old pot.

Use a soil knife to loosen the soil around the edge of the old pot.

Pomegranates are deciduous, so the trees have lost their leaves.  Either that, or I killed them either by leaving them out in the cold too long or by letting them dry out.  They should leaf out again by summer.

I used my fingers to loosen any roots that had grown around the edge of the pot and become matted, just like I do when I transplant vegetables.  Then, I placed the tree in its new pot.

dwarf pomegranate tree in its new pot, waiting for some soil

dwarf pomegranate tree in its new pot, waiting for some soil

I added soil/sand mix to the pot to fill in the gap between the pot and the root ball.  I pushed my fingers into the new soil to remove air pockets.

potting soil and pool filter sand mixture

potting soil and pool filter sand mixture

I watered the plants in their new pots to help settle the soil.  It took about 1.5 pints (0.7 l) in each pot.  As I actually used about two pints, I had to pour off the excess from the stainless steel steam-table pans that I was working in.

dwarf pomegranate trees in their old (front) and new (rear) pots

dwarf pomegranate trees in their old (front) and new (rear) pots

With the gnarled tree trunk and the moss growing around the base, the tree at the rear looks like it could be a bonsai.  I think these dwarf pomegranate trees would be good subjects for bonsai.

I started these dwarf pomegranate trees from seeds a few years ago.  I planted two seeds in each of the pots in a plastic “six-pack,” a smaller version of the one I use to start eggplant and peppers.  The seeds required cold treatment before they would germinate, so after I planted them, I kept the six-pack in the refrigerator (in a plastic bag so they wouldn’t dry out) for six or eight weeks.  Only three seeds germinated out of the twelve that I planted; of course, two were in the same pot so I had to separate them when I first re-potted them.

The dwarf pomegranate trees produce a lot of flowers in the summer and even some tiny fruit, which are edible but very sour.

Advertisements

About brianbreczinski

work: chemist, NMR manager; hobbies: gardening, reading, photography, electronics, biking, woodworking
This entry was posted in fruit, houseplant, transplanting and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Re-potting the Dwarf Pomegranates

  1. Pingback: Moving Flowers Back to the Office | gardenblog2013

  2. Pingback: Re-potting the Dwarf Pomegranates (Again) | gardenblog2013

Questions, Comments, Advice? I'd love to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s