Garden Cleanup and Rabbits

Since the snow is mostly gone, I thought I’d get started on cleaning up the garden today; that is, removing last year’s plants and making the various structures ready for this year.

I started on garden bed number four, which will host the legumes and some herbs this year and had the tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant last year.  I removed the tomato cages and the electric fence posts that they were tied to, and cleaned the vines and dirt off of them.  One of the commercial tomato cages that I used to support peppers wouldn’t come out of the ground, probably because the soil is still frozen in that area.  I’ll try again after we have more warm weather.

In the past, kale that we left in the garden was still growing in the spring.  This spring, the kale that was in garden bed number one was all gone, eaten down to the stumps.

kale stump and rabbit scat

kale stump and rabbit scat

I think I know who the culprit is:  the brown pellets in the photo look like rabbit scat.  I saw more rabbit scat all through garden bed number four.

rabbit scat among old tomato stems

rabbit scat among old tomato stems

Later, I found some rabbit scat near the okra stems, some of which had also been eaten, in garden bed number two.

In addition to the vegetables from my garden (not carrots, though!), rabbits also will browse on the twigs of bushes such as blueberry.

blueberry twigs that have been chewed off

blueberry twigs that have been chewed off

My blueberry bushes are protected by fencing in the form of old tomato cages.  Every spring, I find that any twigs that the rabbits can reach have been pruned.

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About brianbreczinski

work: chemist, NMR manager; hobbies: gardening, reading, photography, electronics, biking, woodworking
This entry was posted in garden cleanup and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Garden Cleanup and Rabbits

  1. Pingback: Spring Kale | gardenblog2013

  2. Pingback: Rabbit Fence | gardenblog2013

  3. Pingback: Rabbit Fence | gardenblog2013

  4. Pingback: Transplanting Okra | gardenblog2013

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